Sunday, October 21, 2007

A Flawed Lady Chatterley Gets Some Love


I am continually floored by some of the inventive montages people put together for YouTube. A friend recently shared this one with me, and it is one of the most effective I have seen in a while. It is a group of well chosen clips from the underrated Sylvia Kristel/Just Jaeckin collaboration LADY CHATTERLEY'S LOVER set to a lovely song called BREATHE ME by Sia.
In her autobiography, Sylvia Kristel calls this the last important film she ever made, and watching these clips is a reminder of how visually striking this flawed but well meaning film is.
Since Sylvia Kristel is going to be coming up here a lot this week, I thought this seemed like a perfect place to start.

6 comments:

Rogue Spy 007 said...

Hey Jeremy. I see you did post it here. Very cool. Glad you enjoyed it. I figured when I saw it. I loved it myself. What a woman Sylvia is.

Jeremy Richey said...

Thanks so much for alerting me to this video Keith...I think it is very nicely done...

Cinebeats said...

I like Lady Chatterly Lover a lot (I'm a sucker for D.H. Lawrence adaptations) so I enjoyed this clip.

I'm really looking forward to your Sylvia Kristel posts this week! I've been curious about the book you mentioned so I'll keep my eyes peeled for your future posts.

Jeremy Richey said...

Thanks Kimberly,
I love Lawrence as well...did you see Ken Russell's BBC version of this with Joely Richardson a few years ago?

Hope you enjoy my look at Borowczyk's LA MARGE...It is a film I really love and I hope I can do some justice to it...

colinr said...

I'm looking forward very much to the latest adaptation, called just Lady Chatterly - a French/Belgium co-production running 168 minutes!

It is apparently based on an earlier version of the DH Lawrence story "John Thomas and Lady Jane" which contains less emphasis on the class conflict and explicit sex but focuses more on the woman's point of view of the story (this film version is directed by a woman also).

Jeremy Richey said...

Thanks Colin,
I am aware of that new version and have been curious...I thought Russell's BBC version from a few years back was most interesting as well, if not among his best works...