Tuesday, April 6, 2010

Images From My All Time Favorite Films: David Lynch's Twin Peaks: The Pilot (1990)

Celebrate the 20th anniversary of David Lynch's timeless series over at the essential Twin Peaks Archive.
For my own personal memories of the show and one of its stars, please click here.

Also, check out Radiator Heaven's terrific tribute here and vote in his special Twin Peaks poll.

10 comments:

J.D. said...

Nice stills, Jeremy! I like the one of the traffic light. Only Lynch could make images of traffic lights and ceiling fans look ominous. I still remember watching the pilot for the first when it aired on TV and getting chills at seeing something so unusual and unlike anything I had seen before.

Jeremy Richey said...

Thanks JD,
Man I can't believe it has been 20 years. I was in high school and the memory of watching that pilot the night it aired will always remain with me.

Jerry Horne said...

Fantastic stills Jeremy! As usual, your choices are quite eloquent and represent a true understanding of the source material. Check out my site on the 8th for a limited treat ;)

Jeremy Richey said...

Thanks Jerry!
That really means a lot and I appreciate it.
Can't wait to see the 'Limited Treat'!

Will Errickson said...

I haven't seen the pilot or the first season since 1990/91 because the experience is one of the best TV-viewing experiences I've ever had. I'm afraid to revisit TWIN PEAKS!

Jeremy Richey said...

Dive back in Will! It still holds up and it will be like revisiting a dear old friend (who is still as cool as ever).

Mike Lippert said...

Another fine set of picture Jermey. When I first clicked on the link to this I was worried that I may be greeted with a photo or two from the silly tacked on ending that was thrown onto this so that it could be released as a self-contained work. I should have known better, you would never do a thing like that.

It's funny, thinking back over this how sometimes the restrait of a medium can do wonders for a filmmaker. Juts compare this pilot to Fire Walk With me in which David Lynch goes way way way over the top and then keeps going and you can see that he maybe works best when someone or something is offside reeling him back a bit. This also seems to hold true for both Straight Story and Mulholland Dr, which I'm sure you know, originally was intended to be a pilot as well.

Jeremy Richey said...

Thanks Mike,
Ugh, that International 'ending' still makes me cringe. So no worries as far as including it in a post.
I like your thoughts here on 'restraint' in relation to this film. It would have absolutely been a different work had this been a theatrical feature, but I don't think it would have been a better one.
This is a very focused, controlled and subtle film but it still has that incredibly disturbing quality that seems specific to Lynch's filmmaking. I love FIRE WALK WITH ME but it's a much more fractured (which fits in with its story) work than this original pilot. I don't think constraining a filmmaker as original and brilliant as Lynch (or really any other artist for that matter) would typically be the way to go but here it works big-time. That said, I am still amazed by how far they let him take this, especially considering what else was on Network TV in the late eighties/early nineties. Hell, this wouldn't even be possible today on Network television.
Anyway, as always thanks for the comments...

J.D. said...

I couldn't agree more, Jeremy. FWWM really is a whole different thing compared to the show. And you could see Lynch heading in that direction with the Gonzo series finale where he spent so much time in the Black Lodge/Red Room.

It's interesting to note how many fans of the show really did not like FWWM because it was missing some of the charm and the warmth but that was Lynch's intention. Though, he still managed to insert some absurd humor in the first third with the adventure of Kiefer Sutherland and Chris Issak's FBI agents.

Edward Copeland said...

I have my own lengthy tribute up.